Sun, 03 Oct

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Brighton

Blue Carbon, kelp & live music

The talk will introduce the concept of “blue carbon” and the potential that rewilding our seas and coasts has for the capture of carbon as well as for further climate change mitigation. It will specifically touch on the Help our Kelp project by the Sussex WT & conclude with some live music.

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Blue Carbon, kelp & live music

Time & Location

03 Oct 2021, 13:30 – 14:30

Brighton, Brighton Marina, Brighton, UK

About the Event

Blue Carbon & the restoration of local kelp forests (#HelpOurKelp)

Marine ecosystems like seagrass meadows, salt marshes and mangroves absorb or ‘draw down’ carbon dioxide from the water and atmosphere. The storage of carbon in marine habitats is called blue carbon. The storage of blue carbon can be in the plants themselves, like seaweed and seagrass; in the seafloor sediment where plants are rooted; or even in the animals which live in the water, including seabirds, fish and larger mammals.

The walk will take us along the beach from the Brighton Marina (free parking!) to Ovingdean Café (1.8 miles, 40 mins). 

The talk will introduce the concept of “blue carbon” and the potential that rewilding our seas and coasts has for the capture of carbon as well as for further climate change mitigation. It will specifically touch on the Help our Kelp project by the Sussex WT which looks to restore 200 sqkm of lost kelp forests between Brighton and Selsey. I will also present my own research on carbon storage in UK salt marshes. We will end the talk with a short (approx. 15-20 minutes) acoustic set by The Lürxx, a rock band which is very invested in nature conservation, science communication and exploring new avenues of collaboration between the arts and the sciences. This will take place either at the beach in Ovingdean.

The role of the arts in science communication and research (Arts-based research)

Arts-based research approaches have evolved from understandings that life and experiences of the world are multifaceted, and that art offers ways of knowing the world that involve sensory perceptions and emotion as well as intellectual responses. ABR can make research more inclusive by including ways to initially bypass the need for verbal expression, to explore problems in physically embodied as well as discursive ways, to capture and express ambiguities and complexities, to collaborate in the refining of ideas, to transform audience perceptions, and to create surprise and engage audiences emotionally as well as critically.

ABR is a relatively new approach to be considered in environmental and sustainability sciences. It’s more widely used in social sciences and psychology.

Background: Our talker Scott holds a BSc in Environmental and Sustainability Studies as well as an MSc in Marine Environmental Protection, with his thesis focussing on the carbon storage capacity of UK salt marshes and how it may be affected by future sea level rise. His research interest is in coastal ecosystems and coastal management, especially human-nature interactions and participatory methods in stakeholder engagement, as well as ABR (arts-based research). He is a former professional musician and is still active making “Music for the Planet” with his band The Lürxx. He also holds a MA in Classics and is passionate about Latin and Ancient History as well as about nature conservation and science communication. 

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